May

27

Co-creating Democracy @ Dialogue Café 0 Reply

Technology and social media are tools for ‘co-creation’ – they enable people to come together and collaborate in new and different ways. Nowhere has the power of social media been more strongly felt than in North Africa and the Middle East. In the last few months, students, protestors and activists have been making use of social media tools and platforms – such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube – to organise themselves, call for change and disseminate information about what has been happening across the region.

In this way, social media enabled a revolution – but could it enable a democracy? Can social media and other technologies be used to co-create a democracy and strengthen civic society? How can social media and other technologies be used to support government “by” and “with” the people and not just “for” the people? What are the key challenges facing the transition to democracy can these be overcome through citizen engagement?

These are some of the challenges and issues we discussed at Dialogue CafĂ© on the 24th and 25th May in the two sessions we organised as part of the SIX Spring School 2011.  

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In Cairo we were joined by, amongst others, Tarek Osman who talked about the longer-term social, economic and political factors, which contributed to the revolution. See here for his article on the subject and here for his latest article on sectarianism in Egypt.

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In Lisbon we were joined by President Jorge Sampaio, High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations and journalists Pedro Lomba and Bruno Faria Lopes. In Doha, we were joined by Yomna Taher and Ahmed Ashour from Al Jazeera Talk and students from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar in Doha. In Rio we were joined by Mayra Jucá from Viva Rio and Oona Castro from OvermundoLab and in Amsterdam we were joined by Thomas Loudon and Arend Jan van den Beld, founders of the VJ Movement, a global community for journalists and citizen journalists.

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May

19

Event 25/5: Designing Democracies, not just Bureaucracies with Doha, Dubai and Cairo 0 Reply

DESIGNING DEMOCRACIES, NOT JUST BUREAUCRACIES WITH DOHA, DUBAI AND CAIRO

Wednesday 25th May
10.30-12.30pm (Amsterdam)
Participating Locations: Cairo, Doha, Amsterdam, Dubai and Lisbon

This global conversation will bring together, via video conferencing, civil society actors, academics, NGOs, students, media activists, policy makers and social innovators in Cairo, Doha, Lisbon and Amsterdam to discuss the challenges and opportunities of co-creation in government.

Across the globe, governments are increasingly interested in citizen engagement and co-creation. But can citizen driven innovation really address social needs in a new way? Can it be used to create a democracy and strengthen civic society? Can it help create institutions that are more open, transparent and user-centred? What are the most effective strategies for governments and public institutions? How can new approaches help governments and businesses become more effective in engaging with communities and inspire meaningful participation in civil society? What can governments, NGOs and citizens’ groups in the Middle East learn from effective models for citizen engagement in Europe?

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

What does co-creation mean in the context of the Arab Spring?
How can social media and other technologies be used to support government and public sector “by” and “with” the people and not just “for” the people?
What are the tools, strategies and approaches that governments and organisations in the Middle East can use to create open, democratic and transparent institutions?
What are the key challenges facing the transition to democracy can these be overcome through citizen engagement?
More than half the population of the Arab world is under 30 years old. Is there a new wave of entrepreneurship and cultural creativity sweeping the Arab world? Is this an opportunity to address youth unemployment?
How can we harness the energy of the revolutionary process and keep citizens engaged in the political process?
Can we create the global and regional platforms and programs that will enable us to share knowledge and learn for each other?

SPEAKERS

Dr. Tarik M. Yousef is the founding Dean of the Dubai School of Government. He joined the School from Georgetown University, where he held the positions of Associate Professor of Economics in the School of Foreign Service, and Sheikh Sabah Al Salem Al Sabah Professor of Arab Studies at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies. An expert on the economies of the Arab world, he received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University with specialization in development economics and economic history. His current research interests include the study of youth inclusion in the Arab world, the political economy of policy reform and development policies in oil-exporting countries. Dr. Yousef’s research and policy experience includes working as Economist in the Middle East Department of the International Monetary Fund, Visiting Senior Economist in the Middle East and North Africa Region of the World Bank, and Senior Advisor for the Millennium Project at the United Nations. At present, he is a Senior Fellow in the Wolfensohn Center for Development at the Brookings Institution and Senior Fellow in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. http://www.dsg.ae/

Loula Zaklama, Rada Research. In 1962, at the age of 19, Ms. Zaklama founded Radar Advertising Agency, the only private sector advertising agency in a completely state-run economy where granting contracts to private firms was nearly impossible. In 1982, she formed RadaResearch & Public Relations Company to answer the needs of international companies looking for wider Middle East exposure. Her clients include IBM, DaimlerChrysler, Proctor & Gamble, Pfizer as well as a number of Egyptian companies. She is also the communication consultant for various ministries in Egypt. As an Egyptian woman, Ms. Zaklama transcended traditional gender barriers to become a highly successful businesswoman. She was selected as one of the “50 Arab leading businesswomen in the Middle East” in 2006 by Forbes and as one of the “50 Leading Women Entrepreneurs of the World” by the Star Group, sponsored by IBC and Fortune Magazine, in 1998.

Dina Wafa is the Director, of GAPP Executive Education, School of Global Affairs and Public Policy (GAPP), American University of Cairo. The mission of the School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Executive Education (GAPP ExecEd) program is to reinforce and reinvigorate leadership capacities within government agencies and public institutions in a challenging global environment within Egypt and the region.
http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/Pages/Home.aspx

Adolfo Mesquita Nunes is a lawyer and an active blogger at www.aartedafuga.blogspot, www.oinsurgente.org and www.ruadireita.blogs.sapo.pt. He is a candidate for Parliament in June’s elections on the lists of the party CDS-PP.

IlĂ­dio Nunes is a digital strategist at Ivity Brand Corp. He is also a partner and the digital manager of the jazz label Clean Feed. http://www.ivity-corp.com/

Dr Ahmed Younis is the Director of Strategic Partnerships & Communications at Silatech. Silatech’s mission is to connect young people, 18-30 years old, with employment and enterprise opportunities. Its commitment is to mobilize interest, investment, knowledge, resources and action to drive large-scale comprehensive employment and enterprise development programmes. Silatech works across three critical domains: Thought Leadership; Investment; and Technology. http://www.silatech.com/

Maartje Nevejan is an independent filmmaker based in Amsterdam, with a background in theatre and multi media. In her projects she likes to research the (raw) poetic quality of reality.  One of Maartje’s recent projects is Couscous & Cola, which was aired on Al Jazeera in 2007. http://www.nevejan.nl/index.html

Diogo Vasconcelos, SIX/Dialogue Cafe (Chair). Since February 2007, Diogo Vasconcelos has been a Distinguished Fellow with Cisco’s Internet Business Solutions Group (IBSG), the global open innovation and strategy group of Cisco.  He chaired the Business Panel on Future EU Innovation Policy, set up European Commission in January 2009, which called for a radical change in European innovation policies and paved the way for the “Innovation Union” initiative approved by the European Council. He co-authored the report on “Europe and Social Innovation” for the BEPA (Cabinet of the President of the European Commission). He Chairs SIX – Social Innovation eXchange, a global community of NGOs, global firms, public agencies and academics committed to improve the methods with which our societies find better solutions to challenges such as ageing, climate change, public services and healthcare. SIX is leading the European Social Innovation initiative, launched in March 2011.

This event is part of the Social Innovation Exchange Spring School 2011. http://www.socialinnovationexchange.org/spring-school-2011

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May

18

Event 24/5: Social Media and the Arab Spring with Cairo and Doha 0 Reply

THE POWER OF PEOPLE THROUGH MEDIA: LESSONS AND CHALLENGES OF THE ARAB AWAKENING BY THOSE WHO MADE IT HAPPEN
Tuesday 24th May
2-4pm (Amsterdam)
Participating cities: Amsterdam, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro, Doha and Cairo

This global conversation will bring together, via video conferencing, civil society actors, academics, NGOs, students, media activists, policy makers and social innovators from Doha, Cairo, Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro and Amsterdam to discuss the role of social media in supporting citizen’s groups and initiatives and looking forward, how the enthusiasm, passion and expertise of citizens can be harnessed to build democratic public institutions. Could this provide a new political paradigm for an Arab Renaissance?

Recent events across the Arab Word have illustrated the profound importance of technology and social media. In Tunisia and Egypt, mobile phones, Facebook and Twitter paved a path for protest and now the seeds of democracy are being sown. Technology and social media are having profound effects in all aspects of our lives: from government and education to business and society. They enable us to rally around common causes and come together to collaborate in new and different ways. They are providing platforms for ‘ordinary’ citizens to become journalists, educators, activists, funders, entrepreneurs and innovators themselves. What really was the role of social media in supporting citizens’ groups during the Arab Spring? What were the effective tactics and tools used by pro-democracy movements and can they be used in other contexts? Going forward, can social media and other technologies be used to co-create a democracy? Can they help co-create institutions that are more open, transparent and user-centred?

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  • What was the role of social media and other technologies in the Revolution?
  • Can media activists and pro-democracy movements around the world learn from the approaches and tactics used by the protesters in Egypt? If so, what?
  • How can social media and other technologies be used to support citizens’ groups during the transition to democracy?
  • A new political paradigm for an Arab Renaissance?

SPEAKERS:

Tarek Osman is the author of Egypt on the Brink: From Nasser to Mubarak. He has published extensively on Egypt and the Middle East in leading UK, Continental European and US publications. His work has been cited widely, including in The Sunday Times, The Financial Times, The Guardian, Foreign Policy, Jerusalem Post, The Economist, and Singapore Straits. For the past 13 years, Tarek has covered and reported on Egypt for a UK publication, an international strategy-consulting firm, and a number of institutional investment houses. He was educated at the American University in Cairo and Bocconi University in Milan. He lives in Cairo and London. http://www.opendemocracy.net/tarek-osman/arab-prospect-forces-and-dynamics

Jan Keulen is the Director of the Doha Centre for Media Freedom. The Doha Centre for Media Freedom is a non-profit organisation working for press freedom and quality journalism in Qatar, the Middle East and the world. http://www.dc4mf.org/en

Yomna Taher is a freelance journalist and documentary filmmaker currently working for Al Jazeera Talk. Al Jazeera Talk is an online Arabic youth community that was established in 2006 on the premise that anyone can be a journalist – all you need is a camera. The platform now supports 300 citizen journalists from all around the world working on a voluntary basis.  Al Jazeera Talk publishes 4 to 5 reports, articles and stories everyday from different countries. During the Revolution, Al Jazeera Talk published exclusive pictures and videos, on the website and on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aljazeeratalk.
www.aljazeeratalk.net

Arend Jan van den Beld is the Founder of VJ Movement and Cartoon Movement. Before that, information management expert at Philips International, Consumer Electronics and Corporate IT. Philips uses these platforms worldwide in their Call Centers and on Internet. Under his guidance, Philips was one of the world’s front-runners in this field. As an independent consultant, he was hired by Achmea Insurances, The Central Dutch Government, The Chambers of Commerce and again Philips. Holds an MA in Psychology, Leiden University (The Netherlands). Arend Jan is the former chairman of a political party in the city council of Haarlem in the Netherlands.

Thomas Loudon is the founder of the VJ Movement and the Cartoon Movement. Both platforms dealing with international news. Pioneered as a Video Journalist, based in Iran, Egypt and Jordan. Covered wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and other stories in the Middle East and Northern Africa. Contributed to CNN, BBC, PBS, NOS, Channel News Asia, Canal 13 and many others. He received several awards for his work. Taught video journalism at the University of Groningen. Speaks six languages. MA in History from Leiden University (The Netherlands) and MS in Journalism from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism (NY, USA). 

Pedro Lomba, Law Professor in European University Institute (Florence) and University of Lisbon/ Political columnist for the leading diary newspaper PĂşblico

Mayra Jucá is from Viva Rio, a non-profit organization engaged in the research and formulation of public policies that aim to promote social development, especially related to issues around urban violence. They have a portal on the Internet, named Viva Favela, focused on the daily life of the favelas, which shows the voice and the views from the local community and offers an agenda that the general media can’t access. The multimedia correspondents are residents of the favelas.  http://www.vivario.org.br/

This event is part of the SIX Spring School 2011. http://www.socialinnovationexchange.org/spring-school-2011

For more information contact julie@dialoguecafe.org

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Olá Sandra! Já foi inscrita. Contamos consigo :) Obrigada pelo interesse.
daliasendra on 2019.01.28